Plus Rigina’s Green Tea Milk Spread

Green Tea Milk Spread by Plus Rigina
Green Tea / Flavoured
250g Jar

I received Plus Rigina’s Green Tea Milk Spread as a gift earlier this year because, as rumour has it, I really like tea and people tend to think I want to try tea things (spoiler: the rumour is true).

First Impressions

Green Tea Milk Spread comes in a glass jar, it’s an imported product from Taiwan. I’ve never seen it in a store in the Metropolitan Vancouver area, and a quick Google search turned up nothing for the brand or product so I’m not entirely sure where you can find it (sorry?). But it’s tea related, and I’m a fan of potential bagel spreads, so I did have to give it a try.

The ingredients in Green Tea Milk Spread are full cream milk powder, sunflower oil, sugar, water, green tea powder, and whey protein. After opening and popping the seal on the lid, I found that the spread has a thick consistency. It’s a bit softer than commercially produced peanut butter, perhaps it’s similar to Nutella (chocolate and hazelnut spread, if you’re not familiar). The aroma of the Green Tea Milk Spread is sweet, and has a very mild green tea aroma. This product is shelf-stable prior to opening, and must be refrigerated after opening.

First Taste

After toasting a bagel, I put the Green Tea Milk Spread on it. I’m not generally one for thick layers of smear on my bagels (aside from cream cheese, I do love cream cheese!) and this product doesn’t seem to lend itself well to being spread thickly on anything (again, it reminds me of Nutella). The mild aroma of green tea is pleasant. The taste of the Green Tea Milk Spread is primarily green tea and condensed milk, although it’s not as sweet as condensed milk. I think it could have a stronger dairy flavour to it, and maybe a bit more sweetness (but it reminds me so much condensed milk, so I feel like it should be sweeter). Despite sugar showing up on the ingredients list prior to green tea powder, each teaspoon (1og) contains 3g of sugar, which is interesting (I’m sure if it was condensed milk, it’d be like 9g of sugar per 10g of product…).

My Overall Impression

I liked Plus Rigina’s Green Tea Milk Spread. I think the flavour is pleasant and makes for a nice bagel spread, so it might also pair well with tea biscuits. For me, I feel like it could be sweeter, but I do have a bit of a sweet tooth. If you’re not as in love with sugar and sweets as I am, you might be really happy with the level of sweetness in the Green Tea Milk Spread. Either way, it’s a nice bagel spread and it does become more liquid-y when heated, so it might be a nice drizzle over some vanilla ice cream as well (because, yum).

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DavidsTea’s Sunny C

Sunny C by DavidsTea
Fruit Infusion / Flavoured
$8.98 for 50g

First Impressions

I picked up a little pouch of Sunny C at one of my local DavidsTea retail locations (yes, I am still very much aware of how lucky I am to have several locations within driving distance to me!). I first smelled this one in store and was intrigued because the aroma of Sunny C reminds me of Tang. If you’re not familiar with Tang, it’s an orange drink mix that smells sweet and chock full of artificial orange flavouring and colour. Sunny C is marketed as an “immune booster bursting with orange, carrot & a sunny dose of Vitamin C”.

If you’re not into drinking your vitamins, vitamin C is also found in many foods – including citrus fruit, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and strawberries. Vitamin C is also important in preventing scurvy and lengthening the duration of the common cold – although there isn’t a lot of evidence to support vitamin C in preventing the common cold. Either way, vitamin C is important.

There are some huge dried fruit pieces in this fruit infusion blend that DavidsTea has put together. Sunny C consists of: apple, carrots, pineapple, orange, hibiscus, lemon peel, pink peppercorns, safflowers, ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and natural flavouring. For something that smells incredibly like Tang, which is the most fake-smelling orange drink  item that I can think of, I’m surprised that orange is the fourth ingredient in the blend and not somewhere higher up.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends steeping Sunny C in 95°C (200°F) water for 5+ minutes. My initial steep of Sunny C was for 7 minutes.

First Taste

Sunny C steeps to a dark reddish pink – a colour that I primarily attribute to the presence of hibiscus flowers and possibly also the safflowers as well. It still smells like Tang, but not as sweet as the dry leaf smells like. The flavour is surprisingly not as sweet as I expected it to be – and doesn’t taste as artificial as I remember Tang to be. Sunny C has a nice citrus flavour, which a pleasant acidic mouthpucker that I am attributing to all the acidic ingredients in the blend. It is a very pleasant fruity infusion that is very pleasant hot – I think it would also make for a nice iced tea as well, given the blend of ingredients, but it’s November and I really don’t want to make iced tea right now.

A Second Cup?

I attempted to resteep Sunny C once, but honestly the flavour was just not there and I would recommend only having one steep with this fruit infusion.

My Overall Impression

I liked DavidsTea’s Sunny C. For a fruity blend, it has a pleasant flavour and smells like a drink that I drank far too often when I was at my neighbour’s house after school when I was waiting for my parents to get home. If your main purpose in drinking it is consume some vitamin C, it isn’t that bad – as per the DavidsTea product page for Sunny C, this fruit infusion contains 15% of the daily recommended intake of vitamin C per cup. That said, there are less expensive ways to get in your daily vitamin C (for instance, an average orange can contain approximately 88% of your daily recommended vitamin C intake), but it is fairly tasty.

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Adagio Teas’ Masala Chai

Masala Chai by Adagio Teas
Black Tea / Flavoured
$8.00USD for 3oz (85g)

First Impressions

Masala Chai came to me in a resealable pouch that had all the necessary information on the label – which is always a nice touch. I have friends and family members with food allergies, so it’s always important to me to be able to check at a quick glance what ingredients are present in a tea blend (thankfully nobody has told me so far that they have an allergy to tea yet!). The rich aroma from the dry leaf is primarily that of the spices that are present in the blend. I can mostly smell the cinnamon and the ginger, as those are the strongest fragrances that I can pick out.

Masala Chai consists of: black tea, cardamom, ginger root, cloves, natural cinnamon flavour, and cinnamon bark. What’s nice is that the ingredients are easy to identify in the blend, there seems to be a fairly even distribution of most of the spices throughout the chai blend.

Preparation

Adagio Teas recommends steeping Masala Chai in 100°C (212°F) water for 7 to 10 minutes. I followed the steeping recommendations and did an initial steep of 10 minutes.

First Taste

Masala Chai steeps to a golden brown with a rich, spicy fragrance from the chai mix. I can easily taste the cinnamon, ginger, and cloves. There’s a pleasant sweetness in the tea, which balances well with the spicy notes with this black tea blend. I do find myself searching a bit for the cardamom, which is a flavour that I quite enjoy in chai blends but I also do recognize that it can be easily overpowered by strong spices such as the ginger and cinnamon.

I did pour myself a cup of Masala Chai, and added a healthy amount of locally sourced honey as well as some evaporated milk. Like many chai blends, this is a tea that takes to the addition of sweetener and milk or cream well.

A Second Cup?

I resteeped Masala Chai twice, adding an additional 30 seconds for each subsequent steep. I found that the first resteep was most similiar to the initial steep – it was a bit watery compared to the initial steep. The second resteep did not fair well, and frankly I did not enjoy it at all. I would say that Masala Chai is good for one more steep.

My Overall Impression

I liked Adagio Teas’ Masala Chai. The flavours of the spices were pleasant, and it did hold it fairly decently to being resteeped. I found myself wishing that the cardamon was more present in the initial steep, and would have liked for it to have a heavier presence in the tea. The other spices were well represented in Adagio Teas’ version of Masala Chai, and I found it to make for a nice cup of tea.

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