Masters Teas’ Rohini Gold Wire

Rohini Gold Wire by Masters Teas
Oolong Tea / Straight
$19.00USD for 2oz

Masters Teas has provided me with Rohini Gold Wire for the purposes of writing an honest review.

First Impressions

One of my favourite types of tea is oolong – and I’m not shy about sharing that. It’s not one that I drank a lot growing up (mostly black and green), but it was one that was had on occasion. So when someone asks if I want the opportunity to try out a single origin oolong tea, I’m not about to say no. Rohini Gold Wire is a single origin oolong from Darjeeling, India. Single origin is an interest term that’s been used a lot lately in the tea industry (and probably other industries as well). Basically what it means that the tea is only from one area, or farm. When you get a grocery store tea, it’ll be (for example) a black tea, but you don’t necessarily know where it came from. Sometimes it’s from multiple farm sources and they get blended together. But a single origin tea is basically as labelled – single origin.

Rohini Gold Wire comes in a sealed, resealable pouch with some information on it from Masters Teas. As it came in sample packaging, I did have to go to the product page on their website to find out more information about it. This is the February 2021 harvest, and is said to be similar to oolongs from China – which makes me really curious and excited to give it a try. The aroma of it is sweet, fruity, and nutty. The leaves are really quite pretty with a nice range in colours that I get to enjoy. There’s that nice pop of spring green in there that is nice to see among the darker shades of green-brown in there.

Preparation

Masters Teas recommends steeping Rohini Gold Wire in 100°C (212°F) water for 3 minutes. I followed the steeping instructions for my initial steep of Rohini Gold Wire.

First Taste

Rohini Gold Wire steeps to a very inviting and friendly shade of yellow. The aroma of this tea is fruity – it reminds me of grapes and peaches – and it has a nice sweetness to it. There’s a slightly thickened texture to the tea, but it’s really quite smooth and I find no bitterness or astringency to it. It’s a nice tea to sip and has a really full-bodied flavour that that can be found throughout each sip and it just is easy to drink. I found the sweetness to remind me of honey and that there was a slight toasted note at the tail end of each sip, but I can’t really place what it reminds me of.

A Second Cup?

I resteeped Rohini Gold wire a total of five times (six steeps total), adding an additional 30 seconds for each subsequent steep. The tea itself became a more darker, golden colour. The flavour turned more fruity and less sweet, but nonetheless easy to drink and tasty.

My Overall Impression

I loved Masters Teas’ Rohini Gold Wire. There was just something really pleasant about this tea to drink. It had a great flavour from start to finish, and I found that the flavour stayed fairly consistent, despite getting less sweet. The leaves themselves performed beautifully and did a great job with resteeping, so I would highly recommend going that route so you can get your money’s worth with this tea. This would be a lovely tea to share with friends or family over some nice bites of something sweet to tea because I think it could compliment both sweets and savouries quite well (but I would reach for the sweets).

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Masters Teas’ Rohini First Oolong

Rohini First Oolong by Masters Teas
Oolong Tea / Straight
$19.00USD for 2oz

Masters Teas has provided me with Rohini First Oolong for the purposes of writing an honest review.

First Impressions

When you get asked if you want to try out teas that were just harvested a couple of months ago, the answer is always yes. It’s such a treat to get to try out a brand new first flush tea that I will almost always jump on the opportunity to give a try. So when Masters Teas asked me about trying some early harvested 2021 teas, of course I said yes. This is Rohini First Oolong, which is described as being a very early first flush tea and comes from Darjeeling, India and is grown at 2000m above sea level.

Rohini First Oolong comes in a sealed, resealable pouch with a nice label across the front. No steeping instructions on this sample, but I was able to find that information on the product page off of the Masters Teas website quite easily. The leaves are quite pretty – there’s a wide range of colours from light to dark green, and browns throughout. The leaves are wiry, with light twists throughout. I found the dry leaf to be a bit floral, with more vegetal undertones than I was expecting based on the description of being fruity.

Preparation

Masters Teas recommends steeping Rohini First Oolong in 180°F (82°C) water for 3 minutes. I followed the steeping instructions for my initial steep.

First Taste

Rohini First Oolong steeps to a very pale yellow for the initial steep. The aroma is a light floral perfume, and grassy vegetal aromas in the background. I found the flavour to be very similar to the aroma of the tea. It has a light floral flavour, with a strong vegetal flavour that really does come through strong. There’s the sweet floral finish at the end of each sip and it just lends itself well to being sipped on. It has a full bodied flavour that has a surprisingly amount of flavour for a tea that’s so pale.

A Second Cup?

I resteeped Rohini First Oolong seven times (eight times total with the same leaves), adding an additional 30 seconds for each subsequent steep. I found that the tea became more golden yellow, much deeper in flavour but also changing at the same time. After the first resteep, the tea got much more floral and sweet with the vegetal notes fading away. There was also an increasing fruity flavour to it that reminded me of the crispness of biting into an apple (specifically gala – which is also one of my favourite apple varietals).

My Overall Impression

I loved Masters Teas’s Rohini First Oolong. While I didn’t enjoy the initial steep as much as I did the later ones, I found the increasing sweet floral flavours and apple notes to be really inviting and delicious. The vegetal flavours captured my attention, but the floral sweetness kept me drinking the tea repeatedly through the steeping session. This oolong is definitely one to dedicate time to so you can enjoy all the nuances in the flavour profile changes with each steep.

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Masters Teas’s Shi Feng Long Jing

Shi Feng Long Jing by Masters Teas
Green Tea / Straight
$29.00USD for 1.5oz (43g)

Masters Teas has provided me with Shi Feng Long Jing for the purposes of writing an honest review.

First Impressions

Shi Feng Long Jing is an offering from Masters Teas from this year’s spring harvest – which is entirely something I’m interested in because who doesn’t want access to newly harvested tea? Long Jing is also known as Dragonwell (which you may have heard of before), and is one of the more well known types of teas to come out of China. This particularly one comes from Zhejiang, China and is grown at 500m above sea level, and was hand picked, which helps to minimize damage to the leaves and the plant itself.

The tea itself has some beautiful light spring green colours – the leaves are long and flattened, which is a familiar characteristic for dragonwell teas. The colour is incredibly vibrant, and there’s just the slightest nutty aroma coming from the tea.

Preparation

No steeping instructions on the packaging, but from their product page, Master Teas recommends steeping Shi Feng Long Jing in 170°F (77°C) water for 2 to 3 minutes. I opted to do an initial steep with 175°F (79°C) water that had been cooled for about 5 minutes and then used to steep Shi Feng Long Jing for 2 minutes.

First Taste

Shi Feng Long Jing steeps to a very pale yellow colour. There’s a definitely grassy and nutty aroma to it. The flavour is quite subtle, but it’s a smooth cup of green tea for sure. The grassy notes are more prevalent while the nutty flavours linger at the tail end of each sip. There was zero bitterness or astringency at the water temperature I used, and the length of steeping time that I used – something greatly appreciated.

A Second Cup?

I resteeped Shi Feng Long Jing seven times (eight steeps total), adding an additional 30 seconds for each subsequent steep. The tea itself became more yellow as I steeped it, and the flavour got stronger. The grassy notes get strongest by about the third or fourth resteep, which is pleasant to experience.

My Overall Impression

I loved Masters Teas’s Shi Feng Long Jing. I’m a sucker for a decent cup of dragonwell, and Shi Feng Long Jing surpassed my expectations. I loved the opportunity in getting to try a newly harvested tea, and it stood up very well to being resteeped over and over again, so I would highly recommend doing that in order to experience the subtle flavour changes, and getting your money’s worth from this tea since it isn’t on the cheaper side of things. The savoury notes from this year’s dragonwell would make it a great pairing for a meal.

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