DavidsTea’s Mango Lemonade

Mango Lemonade by DavidsTea
Black Tea / Flavoured
$8.98 for 50g

First Impressions

We are solidly into autumn with pumpkin spice and apple pies, but when a tea blogger still has some untried iced tea in the box of new-to-her teas, we’re going to discuss some iced teas. This is a black tea blend from DavidsTea called Mango Lemonade and I definitely purchased it online with the plan to make it iced. Of course, I purchased a lot of teas to make iced over the summer, and honestly we just didn’t host as many events or go to as many events as we originally hoped would be possible. Things have been up and down here in British Columbia in terms of opening up, restrictions, and just gauging the comfort level of our friends and family has been important to us in order to keep everyone safe and comfortable. That said, here’s a black tea blend that I got to try, and let’s see what both me and my husband thought of it!

Mango Lemonade comes in sealed, resealable silver pouch. It has a very familiar label from DavidsTea. I’ve commented before in the last about the tiny print and really, that still hasn’t changed. Mango Lemonade consists of: apple, candied mango, black tea, hibiscus blossom, candied pomelo peel, natural flavouring, orange, sweet blackberry leaf, and rose petals. The aroma of this blend reminds me a lot of mango candy and a blend of oranges and lemon (there is that pomelo in there – and if you’re not familiar with the fruit, it is part of the citrus family). It’s a pretty blend to look at, and I would highly recommend giving your bag a shake if it is sitting in your tea stash for a while. When I first opened it up, all I saw were the fruity pieces. I did have to give it a shake to redistribute the black tea leaves throughout.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends steeping Mango Lemonade in 95°C (200°F) water for 3 to 5 minutes. I followed the steeping instructions and did an initial steep of Mango Lemonade for 5 minutes.

First Taste

Mango Lemonade steeps to a surprisingly orange tea. I say surprisingly because of the presence of hibiscus blossoms in the blend, and that usually lends itself to steeping a bright pink (which I am a fan of). Steeping this reminds me of mango and lemons, it has a great bright burst of citrus flavours and I really enjoy it. It’s not as sweet as I would have liked a lemonade inspired tea to be, even with the presence of candied fruit. There’s a bit of an aftertaste to Mango Lemonade that reminds me a lot of lemongrass.

A Second Cup?

As a primarily fruit infusion, Mango Lemonade didn’t resteep well because a lot of those fruity flavours in the initial steep were just lacking in the second go around with the same leaves. I would recommend Mango Lemonade for just the one steep.

My Overall Impression

I  liked DavidsTea’s Mango Lemonade. While I really enjoyed the mango and citrus flavours in this black tea blend, I found that the black tea didn’t really shine through in this blend in a way that made me enjoy it. The lemongrass aftertaste didn’t really round out the flavour of the blend the best, because I was hoping for a stronger fruit presence. As for what my husband thought, he still prefers the ‘usual’ flavours of iced teas that I often make, so it’s not likely to be a regular feature in our fridge when I go to make iced teas.

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.

DavidsTea’s Hibiscus Splash

Hibiscus Splash by DavidsTea
Fruit Infusion / Flavoured
$8.98 for 50g

First Impressions

Never quite done with iced teas, am I? This is a fruity infusion from DavidsTea with a bright yellow label across a sealed, resealable pouch. This was part of an online order that I made and was included as a free gift with purchase. Luckily, it wasn’t one that I had tried before I decided it would make a good option to review.

Hibiscus Splash consists of: apple pieces, candied pineapple, hibiscus blossoms, natural flavouring, fig slices, rose pepper, cranberries, cornflower blossoms, and stevia extract. The aroma of the dry leaf is primarily pineapple and figs, with hints of fruitiness throughout the background. It’s a nice fruity blend, and makes me want an iced tea.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends steeping Hibiscus Splash in 95°C (200°F) water for over 5 minutes. I opted to do an initial steep with the recommended water temperature for 7 minutes.

First Taste

Hibiscus Splash steeps to a bright red, most likely thanks to the hibiscus blossoms in the blend. The flavour reminds me a lot of a fruit punch or mixed fruit juice box. It has a distinctly cherry quality to it, and it has the tartness from the hibiscus. There’s a nice sweetness to it, which I suspect is due to the apple, candied pineapple, and stevia. It does have a touch of an aftertaste with it with the stevia, but the cherry flavour is much stronger than the other flavours.

A Second Cup?

I attempted to resteep Hibiscus Splash, but found that it didn’t resteep well. The initial steep has a lovely flavour, but the subsequent steep did not and was fairly void of strong flavours.

My Overall Impression

I liked DavidsTea’s Hibiscus Splash. The flavour reminds me a lot of a fruit punch, with a strong cherry flavour. It has a good flavour for the initial steep, but it was definitely meant for one steep only.  The cherry flavouring is strong, and the fruit infusion does steep well. I’m not partial to cherry, unfortunately, but I think that cherry fans would enjoy it considerably more than I did – especially iced.

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.

DavidsTea’s Mini Matcha Maker

Mini Matcha Maker by DavidsTea
Tritan Plastic / 8oz (235mL)
$15.00

First Impressions

I got my Mini Matcha Maker sometime last year (this design is called “Spring Leaves” and is no longer available on the DavidsTea website as it was a seasonal design) – and I actually got it on sale (the price I mentioned above is the regular price for a Mini Matcha Maker if it’s not on sale/clearance due to a seasonal design).

The overall idea of the Mini Matcha Maker is to make it easy to make matcha at home or on the go, and to essentially make what they call “matcha shots” – which is perfect if you’re the type to mix your matcha with something else. For instance, lots of people will put matcha into smoothies or milkshakes, mix it up with sparkling water, lemonade or just mix up that matcha powder and then dilute it with more water because they don’t like it that strong (everyone has a preference, right?).

There are a few components to the Mini Matcha Maker – you have the lid (with the pressure release button), the body (double-walled), the shaker part (see below: the piece with the ball) and then another piece with a mesh (that the shaker part screws onto, and it screws onto the body).

Preparation

I washed all the pieces with warm soapy water and then allowed to air dry. The Mini Matcha Maker is not dishwasher or microwave friendly (there is metal, and it is double-walled).

First Use

Assembling the Mini Matcha Maker is fairly straight forward. The nice part about the Mini Matcha Maker is the ease of use – I utilized the metal mesh of the piece that holds onto the shaker to use to sift the powder as I poured it into the Mini Matcha Maker. Then I poured water (heated to the recommended temperature) to the line, followed by screwing the lid on and holding it (without my finger on the button!) to shake it up. Because the matcha gets sifted through the mesh, I find it doesn’t clump and it shakes up pretty easily. You’re done whenever you’re happy with the way it’s been mixed or with the level of froth (or both), and (aiming away from your face) then hit the button the release the pressure. Once that’s done, just unscrew the lid and pour the matcha into the drink of your choice, over ice, etc.

Clean up is pretty easy (in my opinion) as I just do it in a sink with some warm soapy water and then just rinse everything well. As it’s not dishwasher friendly, my Mini Matcha Maker either lives in the cupboard or on the dish rack when its not in use.

My Overall Impression

I loved DavidsTea’s Mini Matcha Maker. I think it’s definitely a fun way to make matcha without the traditional use of a bowl with bamboo whisk. That said, if you’re really attached to a more traditional matcha preparation method, the Mini Matcha Maker won’t be for you. However, for those are more about the end product and ease of preparation, the Mini Matcha Maker is quite the modern option when it comes to preparing some matcha for a mixed drink. If you’re looking for a method to make matcha for at the office purposes and drink a lot of it, the larger Matcha Maker might be an option for you. I certain enjoy this little device, it’s fun and easy to use (and clean!).

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.