DavidsTea’s Perfect Pitcher

Perfect Pitcher by DavidsTea
BPA-Free Plastic / 2L (68oz)
$28.00

First Impressions

One of the reasons why I bought the Perfect Pitcher was because I needed another pitcher and the other reason is because it qualified me for DavidsTea’s annual Summer Tea Club. Basically how the club works is that you purchase a qualifying piece of teaware and then you get a percentage off of qualifying loose leaf tea purchases (20% off when you buy 100g or more of one particular tea). Since I buy a lot of fruity tisanes anyways for iced teas during the summer, it seemed like a good deal.

In order to make this purchase worth it, I’d have to spend $140 on qualifying loose leaf tea purchases to ‘save’ what I already spent on the pitcher but I had a lot of gift cards that had been given to me (from birthdays and Christmases) that I kept on forgetting to bring into the store, so it was a combination of cash and gift cards that made the pitcher worth it (and luckily mostly gift cards). So if you don’t spend a lot of money on tea, it might not be worth it to you if you’re not already in the market for a new pitcher (because, frankly, there are cheaper pitchers out there!).

I picked the Soft Blue colour because it best fit with what I had already in terms of teaware and I just liked this colour the best. The tag boasts that the Perfect Pitcher is designed to lay flat, fit inside of a fridge door, and is made of shatter-resistant Tritan plastic (which is BPA-free). The Perfect Pitcher holds 2L (2000mL), or 68oz of liquid. The Perfect Pitcher also has a removeable infuser, and an airtight lid (which is probably good, considering they say you can lay it flat…).

Preparation

Prior to using my Perfect Pitcher for the first time, I unassembled it and washed all the pieces in warm soapy water. The pitcher comes apart into six pieces, with the infuser portion being three pieces. Because it isn’t one continuous piece for the infuser, it makes for easier cleaning if you don’t have a bottle brush, which is nice. The mesh is white, which makes it seem like it might pick up colour easily if you have highly pigmented teas (more on that later). The lid and spout/handle pieces both have an o-ring-like seal layer inside for the air-tight/leak-proof seal.

First Use

The first time I used the Perfect Pitcher was to steep Mango Fruit Punch for a party. It was easy to use, I just scooped the tea into the infuser and then connected it to the lid. Hot water went into the pitcher and then I popped the lid on for it to steep. I found the infuser easy to clean and to remove the loose leaf tea after I was done infusing the fruity tisane. The white mesh of the strainer wasn’t as bright white as it was when I started – it had picked up a bit of a yellow tinge.

DavidsTea’s instructions are to use 4 to 8 Perfect Spoons of dry leaf, and then fill the pitcher half-full (32oz/1L) with hot water, and then allow the tea to infuse as per steeping instructions. After removing the infuser, you top it up with ice to cool down the tea for an iced tea. I actually use my Perfect Pitcher to make iced tea with all water, and then pop the pitcher into my fridge once it’s cooled down to room temperature, or I cold steep it directly in the pitcher with room temperature water (and popped into the fridge for anywhere from 8 to 10 hours).

My Overall Impression

I liked DavidsTea’s Perfect Pitcher. I quite like the design of the pitcher, it’s light-weight and use to use. I find that the handle is comfortable and I do enjoy the colour. I do, however, wish that the infuser’s mesh didn’t pick up colour as easily as it did because I found that it stained with the first use, which wasn’t very fun. I also would like if DavidsTea produced a glass pitcher instead – I actually own a glass pitcher that I purchased from DavidsTea several years ago (designed by another company) – as I just find glass products to be generally more durable.

Sure we’ve been told that BPA is bad for us now, but for a long time it was considered safe so who knows what’s in store for use for the future when it comes to plastic usage? For now, I’ll be using my Perfect Pitcher anyways, it’s super handy to have around and makes for some easy tea steeping. I think the price is a bit steep for what it is, so you’d have to be really wanting a new pitcher to make the price worth it (I thought it was great that I had gift cards to help cover the cost of the pitcher, and my subsequent loose leaf tea purchases!).

DavidsTea’s Jasmine Crème Brulée

Jasmine Crème Brulée by DavidsTea
Green Tea / Flavoured
$8.98 for 50g

First Impressions

My first exposure to Jasmine Crème Brulée was as an iced tea sample in-store when it was the Tea of the Month – which is also the reasoning for the packaging. I actually bought the bag after it was the Tea of the Month, which meant this pouch was on sale because there was a new TotM. It was a bit of a perk, since it can be hard sometimes to get tea on sale – especially a tasty one. The dry leaf of Jasmine Crème Brulée smells like vanilla custard with floral notes and some fruity hints somewhere in there.

The ingredients in Jasmine Crème Brulée are as follows: apple, jasmine tea, rosehip shells, pineapple, sweet blackberry leaves, marigold flowers, natural and artificial flavouring. Like a lot of tea blends, I found that the smaller ingredients tended to settle at the bottom, so I had to give the bag a good shake to redistribute the ingredients again in order to get a spoonful that had the green tea in it.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends steeping Jasmine Crème Brulée in hot water for 3 to 5 minutes. I really do wish that they would go back to listing actual temperature values. I used the green tea setting on my Breville IQ Kettle and did an initial steep of Jasmine Crème Brulée at 79°C (175°F) for 3 minutes.

First Taste

Jasmine Crème Brulée steeps to a light golden yellow. There’s a nice jasmine/floral aroma that comes up from the tea, as well as something that definitely reminds me of a vanilla custard. I’m not sure how much of the green tea I actually taste, but this blend has a nice floral taste to it, some vanilla notes, and I’m not sure how much of the fruit ingredients I’m tasting. There’s a delicate creaminess to Jasmine Crème Brulée that has a nice buttery quality to it, which may be why it got its name. When steeped for 3 minutes, there was no astringency or bitterness from the green tea.

I iced some of the Jasmine Crème Brulée to try it cold and found it to be quite refreshing. I think this is one of those teas that does well both hot and iced. There was enough sweetness to it that I didn’t find myself needing any sweetener for either the hot or iced tea.

A Second Cup?

I resteeped Jasmine Crème Brulée twice, adding an extra 30 seconds for each subsequent steep. I found the first resteep was quite similar to the initial steep in terms of the depth of flavour, while the second resteep was lacking some of that sweetness but was still palatable.

My Overall Impression

I loved DavidsTea’s Jasmine Crème Brulée. I really enjoyed the flavour profile of this green tea blend with the floral notes and the vanilla custard flavours. The creaminess and buttery qualities of this tea make for a great mouthfeel and there’s a nice sweetness to it. I found this tea equally enjoyable for both hot and iced. I think it’d be a great candidate for cold steeping so you don’t accidentally oversteep the green tea.

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DavidsTea’s Just Peachy

Just Peachy by DavidsTea
Fruit Infusion / Flavoured
$7.98 for 50g

First Impressions

Spoiler, I’ve had Just Peachy before. It’s one of my favourite summer-time iced teas from DavidsTea and I realize a little while ago that I hadn’t written about it yet for One More Steep so I decide to do so. I first had Just Peachy in-store when it was offered as an iced tea sample (I’ve also had it hot before and I’ll discuss both further below). The dry leaf of Just Peachy has a very strong peach, fruity aroma to it – which is unsurprising considering the ingredients in the blend.

Just Peachy consists of apple, sweet blackberry leaves, peach, natural and artificial flavouring. Of all the ingredients, the one that stands out the most is probably the peach aroma with the hint of apple in the background. If you’re a fan of peach-based iced teas, you might like this one.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends steeping Just Peachy in near-boiling water for 4 to 7 minutes. I steeped Just Peachy in 93°C (200°F) water for 6 minutes. I tend to be okay with steeping herbal or fruit infusions for a lengthier period of time because, unlike teas, they don’t have the tea leaves in there that can become bitter or astringent when oversteeped.

First Taste

Just Peachy steeps to a pleasant warm orange colour with a strong peach aroma. The flavour of Just Peach is peach and sweet. I find that the fruit ingredients in Just Peachy are enough that I don’t have to add any sweetener to it – of course your mileage may vary with your sweet tooth. The apple is also a very present flavour in this fruit infusion as well, but the flavour of the apple doesn’t overwhelm or overpower the peach, which is nice considering it’s Just Peachy and not Just Apple.

I’ve had Just Peachy both hot and iced. I find when it’s hot, it’s sweeter. When iced, Just Peachy is a nice, refreshing iced tea. I like it both ways, but really prefer to have it iced (especially when the weather’s hot!). I generally cold steep a pitcher of Just Peachy to enjoy throughout the week.

A Second Cup?

I try to resteep Just Peachy, but find that the flavour just isn’t there in comparison to the initial steep. I would say that Just Peachy is good for one steep.

My Overall Impression

I loved DavidsTea’s Just Peachy. Not really much of a surprise considering it’s a fruit infusion blend that I’ve (re)purchased. I really enjoy the fruity flavours of the peach and love the fact that I don’t have to add any extra sugar or sweetener for it to be a sweet iced tea. Just Peachy is definitely one that I recommend having iced (although it’s very tasty as a hot tisane as well).

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.