DavidsTea’s Forever Frosty

Forever Frosty by DavidsTea
Herbal Infusion / Flavoured
$8.98 for 50g

First Impressions

Forever Frosty piqued my interest because it’s a winter/seasonal version of Forever Nuts – which is a long-time fan favourite (and if you want to see some seriously poor tea photography, you can check out my 2016 review of Forever Nuts!) and a tisane that I enjoy usually as a latte. Which, of course, meant that I was curious enough to pick up a bag to give it a try.

This is a curious blend that came in a sealed, resealable silver pouch. A very familiar bright yellow label adorns the bag and gives you all the necessary information about the blend. I highly recommend giving it a good shake before scooping some out to steep because all I saw when I first opened the bag were huge candied almonds and large slices of dried oranges. Not very appealing! Forever Frosty smells like cinnamon and oranges, which is nice, but doesn’t really make me think of Forever Nuts. Surprisingly, I don’t really smell almonds. Forever Frosty consists of: apple, candied almonds, almonds, orange slices, marshmallows, cinnamon, beetroot, coconut flakes, orange peel, cloves, artificial sweet roasted almond, and natural orange flavouring.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends steeping Forever Frosty in 95°C (200°F) water for 5+ minutes. I opted to follow the steeping instructions and I did an initial steep for 5 minutes.

First Taste

Forever Frosty steeps to a very bright pink, a lovely colour from the beetroot. It has a very sweet, orange aroma to it with hints of cinnamon mingling in the background. I don’t really smell or taste almonds, which is unfortunate because that’s one of the key components of Forever Nuts. The colour is significantly brighter, in my opinion, than the pink of Forever Nuts. I do find there’s a bitter component to the blend though, which isn’t very pleasant. Sweet, bitter, orange, and cinnamon – with the cinnamon being the real wintery flavour that I can make out in the tisane.

A Second Cup?

I attempted to resteep Forever Frosty, but it didn’t really improve matters and just resulted in a fairly weak drink. I would recommend Forever Frosty for just one steep.

My Overall Impression

I didn’t like DavidsTea’s Forever Frosty. I think it was a very valiant attempt at a seasonal take on the perennial favourite Forever Nuts, but I don’t think it quite captured enough of the essence of Forever Nuts or the season, which is unfortunate. I was really hoping that the flavour and aroma of the almonds would come out more, especially since almonds appear in the ingredients three times.

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.

DavidsTea’s Organic David’s Chai

Organic David’s Chai by DavidsTea
Black Tea / Flavoured
$8.98 for 50g

First Impressions

Organic David’s Chai comes a fairly familiar looking bag by now – sealed, resealable, silver pouch. The dark blue label on the front helps to identify it at a glance as a black tea (not going to lie, I do like colour coding my teas because it just makes it easier to organize…). David’s Chai is described as a warm & spicy classic. I’m as much of a fan of chai as the next girl, so lets get this started!

The aroma from the dry leaf is lovely – plenty of spicy notes and I can make out the majority of the ingredients. I can really smell the cinnamon and ginger. David’s Chai consist of organic: black tea, ginger, cinnamon, anise, star anise, cardamom, black pepper and clove buds.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends steeping Organic David’s Chai in 95ºC (200ºF) water for 3 to 5 minutes. I opted to follow the steeping instructions and did an initial steep of 5 minutes.

First Taste

David’s Chai steeps to a really pretty golden brown colour. The aroma is warming with all those spice notes wafting up from my fancy mug. It’s quite inviting, which is one of the things I love about a nice chai. The flavour is a lovely blend of all the spices – although I can make out the ginger, cinnamon, star anise and cardamom specifically. It has a nice smooth texture to it, spicy notes and really warms me up from the inside out.

I could see this being a lovely chai blend candidate for getting that infamous double boil preparation on the stove top for a more traditional chai preparation method.

A Second Cup?

I resteeped David’s Chai once, for 6 minutes. I found the flavour to be pleasant, but not nearly as warming as the initial steep. I would personally do just one steep of David’s Chai but I could see some people enjoying a second steep of the same leaves.

My Overall Impression

I loved DavidsTea’s Organic David’s Chai. I found to be quite a pleasant experience from the dry leaf, to inhaling the aroma of the steeped tea, to drinking it. The blend of spices was quite nice and enjoyable, which is what really made it delicious. I would recommend adding sweetener if you prefer your chai a bit more sweet as it isn’t very sweet (I personally would use honey, but agave or granulated sugar would work just as well).

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.

DavidsTea’s Candy Cane Matcha

Candy Cane Matcha by DavidsTea
Green Tea (Matcha) / Flavoured
$9.98 for 50g

First Impressions

I picked up a bag of Candy Cane Matcha as part of the Cyber Monday sales that DavidsTea had online. I quite like mint (and I do enjoy candy canes), so I was curious as to how it would taste when paired with matcha. This is a seasonal offering, so if you’re thinking about giving it a try don’t sit on the fence too long. Candy Cane Matcha came in a sealed, resealable silver pouch with a bright green label on the front.

The powder itself is a pale pistachio green and has a very strong minty aroma to it. Candy Cane Matcha consists of: cane sugar, matcha green tea, milk powder, natural candy cane flavouring. I do question how does one get natural candy cane flavouring, considering how candy canes are a candy. Candy Cane Matcha is described as a matcha drink mix and is labelled as such so nobody will be confusing it with a traditional, straight matcha.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends mixing Candy Cane Matcha with 85°C (185°F) water, so I followed the temperature recommendation.

I sifted Candy Cane Matcha into my bowl first, and then whisked it with my bamboo whisk. You can probably get away with a handheld milk frother to mix it, as I find that the matcha drink mixes often do well in heated water. If you’re new to preparing matcha, you can find out more tips and tricks in my article The Basics of Preparing Matcha.

First Taste

Candy Cane Matcha whisks easily enough in water, but I honestly forgot about the fact that milk powder was a listed ingredient when I was whisking it and genuinely thought that something had got off about the drink mix because of the colour. It’s a milky pale green and if you’re used to how a matcha is supposed to look like – you might find this a bit off-putting. Once I reviewed the list of ingredients and reminded myself that milk powder is present, I didn’t find it so wrong anymore.

Candy Cane Matcha does smell delightfully minty, which met my expectations given the name. I found it to be sweet and minty in flavour. The matcha itself isn’t very noticeable, but that’s really not surprising given the intensity of a flavour like mint. I did find it quite tasty though, and plenty sweet – but not cloyingly so.

A Second Cup?

As Candy Cane Matcha is a suspension, there were no second helpings with the same powder.

My Overall Impression

I liked DavidsTea’s Candy Cane Matcha. I found the aroma and the flavour to be spot-on for what I expected from a matcha blended with candy cane. I do wish that perhaps that it had more of a matcha flavour to it, but it does make me think of the holidays so I do think that it was appropriately minty. I can see this making an excellent matcha latte for the holidays, and perhaps would even do well with a bit of eggnog in there as well.

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.