Transitioning from Coffee to Tea

I will preface this by stating that I am not a coffee drinker. I never have been, and never really be too interested in coffee (I’m not a fan of the smell!). But I do know that a lot of people enjoy coffee and need or have gotten used to that extra jolt of caffeine in the morning to help them start their day. As a health care professional, I know a lot of people who love their coffee.

There are a few benefits to switching from coffee to tea, here are a few that I’ve brainstormed for you all:

Less teeth stains!
No more coffee breath.
Lower your caffeine consumption.
Easier on the stomach.
Being slightly more hydrated.

Yes, both tea and coffee contains caffeine naturally (herbal tisanes and decaffinated drinks aside). But tea contains less caffeine than coffee, so you will experience less of that caffeine jolt when drinking it. For some, lowering the caffeine consumption may be something recommended to you by your health care professional for a myriad of reasons. And cup for cup, you’ll consume less caffeine with tea than coffee which means less diuretic effects (and helps you stay hydrated).

If you’re the habitual multi-cup coffee per day drinker, how do you make that switch? Start by swapping out one cup of coffee for a cup of tea. Work your way up to no coffee and all tea, or keep that one-cup-a-day and feel good about yourself having transitioned the rest to tea.

It’s unrealistic to quit coffee cold turkey and go straight to tea – you’ll get caffeine withdrawals and the headaches to boot, and unless you’re in a serious health crisis, why do that to yourself? Make the gradual transition by just swapping out one cup a day for tea.

My tea recommendations for someone making the transition from coffee to tea are as follows:

Plain black coffee with English Breakfast or Assam black tea.
Swap your cafe au lait with black tea (Orange pekoe) with milk.
Pumpkin Spice Latte with a Pumpkin Spice Chai Latte.
Iced latte with Iced Hong Kong-Style Milk Tea.
Vanilla latte with a London Fog (Earl Grey Tea Latte).
Shot of espresso with a matcha shot.

DavidsTea’s Golden Lily

Golden Lily by DavidsTea
Oolong Tea / Straight
$16.48 for 50g

First Impressions

Golden Lily is an oolong tea that was part of an online order I made with DavidsTea. This tea comes in a familiar silver bag that comes sealed and is resealable with a dark blue across the front (and yes, in certain lights I imagine that teal blue lettering with a darker blue background to be difficult to read – I really don’t think it’s very friendly for anyone with vision issues). That said, it’s familiar to me, so I’m a bit used to it by now.

Golden Lily is an organic oolong tea from Thailand, and according to the label is certified organic by the USDA and Canada Organic. The leaves are a variety of shades of green and brown, with very tightly bunched leaves. The aroma is floral with just a subtle hint of sweetness.

Preparation

DavidsTea recommends steeping Golden Lily in 90°C (195°F) water for 4-5 minutes. I opted to steep with the recommended water temperature and did a steep for 5 minutes.

First Taste

Golden Lily steeps to what I could best describe as a light golden yellow. The aroma of tea has a nice amount of floral notes, with something that reminds of butter. Drinking Golden Lily is quite pleasant as well – I found floral notes mingling along with creamy flavours, stone fruit that reminds of apricots, and just a hint of grassy freshness. The tea itself is smooth with no astringency or bitterness when steeped with the recommended steeping time and temperature of water.

A Second Cup?

I resteeped Golden Lily a total of seven times, adding an additional 30 seconds for each subsequent steep. The tea became more darker in golden colour, and had a great buttery flavour that became more deep as I steeped. The flavour is really nice and stays fairly consistent with each steep.

My Overall Impression

I loved DavidsTea’s Golden Lily. While Golden Lily is not the least expensive oolong I’ve tried, I find that the ability to resteep the leaves successfully and the amount of flavour that you get from these gorgeous leaves more than makes up for it because of the quality of the leaves themselves. I would highly recommend resteeping these leaves, as you get a lot more tea out of it and more bang for your buck. The flavour of these leaves are pleasant with a great amount of floral flavour that I really enjoy and would be happy to drink this at any time of day.

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.

Dessert by Deb’s Thai Coconut Milk Tea

Thai Coconut Milk Tea by Dessert by Deb
Black Tea / Flavoured
$16.00 for 75g

Thai Coconut Milk Tea is an exclusive blend for Dessert by Deb subscription subscribers and is available for purchase by subscribers only at this time.

First Impressions

Thai Coconut Milk Tea came as part of my Dessert by Deb subscription box, and the name really intrigued me. As you may know if you’ve been following my blog and Instagram (@onemoresteep) for a while now, I’m a huge fan of Hong Kong Style Milk Tea. It’s something that I’ve grown up drinking. But Thai milk tea? Not something that I’m too familiar with. I think I tried it at a Vancouver Tea Festival, but not something that I’m super familiar with.

This black tea blend came to me in a sealed, resealable golden pouch. When I opened the package, the thing that really caught my attention first was the smell of the coconut and lemongrass. I do love the brightness of lemongrass, so it’s a pleasant aroma. Thai Coconut Milk Tea consists of organic: black tea, coconut, lemongrass, vanilla, and toasted coconut. It’s quite a pretty dry leaf:

Preparation

Dessert by Deb recommends steeping Thai Coconut Milk Tea in 212°F (100°C) water for 5 to 7 minutes, and to enjoy this black tea blend as an iced tea latte. I opted to follow the steeping recommendations and do a steep for 6 minutes. I added the tea to ice in a tall glass, and topped it off with organic unsweetened soy milk.

First Taste

Thai Coconut Milk Tea steeps to a light golden yellow. There’s a nice fragrance of coconut and lemongrass, I don’t really notice the black tea base when I tried it straight. It’s kind of nice, but not too exciting when drank plain. After topping off the tea with some soy milk, the colour turns to a milky light tan colour (perhaps too much milk to tea?). The flavour is nicely coconut and lemongrass, with hints of black tea which shines a bit more than it did when I tried it plain. It’s not as sweet as I was expecting, but there were any super sweet ingredients in the blend, and nor did I add sweetener.

A Second Cup?

I attempted to resteep Thai Coconut Milk Tea once, but found that the flavour with the coconut and the lemongrass wasn’t really present compared to the initial steep. I would recommend just the initial steep if you’re interested in having it as intended (as an iced latte).

My Overall Impression

I liked Dessert by Deb’s Thai Coconut Milk Tea. For a nice at-home iced tea latte option, I found Thai Coconut Milk Tea to be pleasantly flavourful. I think the black tea base could be stronger, but the coconut and lemongrass notes are pleasant. I would recommend to prepare it as intended (iced latte versus straight/plain), and perhaps adding some form of sweetener to really have a nice tropical milk tea vibe (rock sugar would be a great option!).

Curious about the cup rating system? Click here to learn more.