Masters Teas’s Rohini First Flush

Rohini First Flush by Masters Teas
Black Tea / Straight
$19.00 for 2oz

Masters Teas has provided me with Rohini First Flush for the purposes of writing an honest review.

First Impressions

When a tea company asks if you’re interested in trying the very first harvested tea of the year, the answer is yes. There’s some fantastic flavours that can come from harvests at different types of the year – it all depends on the amount of sunlight versus shade, water, altitude, fertilizer. Everything comes into play when you get into single origin teas.

Rohini First Flush was harvested this year – late February and processed in March 2020. This black tea is from Darjeeling, India and came to me in a sealed, resealable pouch that I’ve come to be familiar with when it comes to Masters Teas’s packaging. The tea itself doesn’t look like a typical black tea. There’s a myriad of different colours, lots of fuzzy leaves mixed in, and I honestly thought it was either a green or white tea just based purely on appearances.

There’s a really pleasant aroma to the leaves – it reminds me of a mix of floral and honeycrisp apples (which I love!). Rohini First Flush consists of only black tea leaves.

Preparation

Masters Teas recommends steeping Rohini First Flush in 212°F (100°C) water for 2 to 3 minutes. I opted to do an initial steep for 2½ minutes.

First Taste

Rohini First Flush steeps to a pale yellow for the initial steep. There’s a sweet floral note to it that’s quite inviting. I found that it was smooth, with just a slight bite at the tail end of each steep. The flavour is nice – the honeycrisp apple aroma translates well to a fruity flavour in the steeped tea, while the floral notes add a nice sweetness to the tea itself. It reminds me of a milder version of a breakfast tea, which I find traditionally has a robust, astringent flavour to it that really needs to be tempered down with some evaporated milk or sweetener at times. Rohini First Flush though doesn’t have nearly as strong of an astringency to it, or maltiness. It has a pleasantly smooth flavour that is only met with the slightest of astringent notes at the end of each sip.

A Second Cup?

I resteeped Rohini First Flush three times (four steeps total), adding an additional 30 seconds for each subsequent steep. The tea steeps to a more golden colour for the subsequent steeps and has a stronger apple/fruity flavour to it. Rohini First Flush remains a pleasant, smooth cup of tea.

My Overall Impression

I loved Masters Teas’s Rohini First Flush. For a black tea, it was a truly unique experience from leaf to steep with this first flush tea because of the nuances in the flavour and the behaviour of the tea itself. A pleasant experience and delicious to boot, since I do adore honeycrisp apples. This is definitely a black tea that you should enjoy straight up with no added cream and sugar – and be sure to resteep as it does well and you can get more flavour of the leaves.

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Masters Teas’s Huang Shan Mao Feng

Huang Shan Mao Feng by Masters Teas
Green Tea / Straight
$17.00USD for 1.5oz

Masters Teas has provided me with Huang Shan Mao Feng for the purposes of writing an honest review.

First Impressions

Huang Shan Mao Feng is a Chinese green tea from Masters Teas that came in a sealed, printed and resealable pouch. There was some information on the packaging, the rest I gleaned from the product page online. The leaves are dark green and wiry that have a mix of light fruity and floral aromas.

This tea originates from Anhui, China from the farmer Liao Xiao Juan. This straight green tea was grown at 800m elevation above sea level and harvested in April 2019.

Preparation

Master Teas recommends steeping Huang Shan Mao Feng at 170°F (77°C) for 2 to 3 minutes. I heated my water to 175°F (79°C) and allowed it to cool for 5 minutes before doing an initial steep for 2 minutes.

First Taste

Huang Shan Mao Feng steeps to a very pale yellow colour after the initial steep for 2 minutes. I found that the flavour was surprisingly more complex than I had initially thought it would be. Huang Shan Mao Feng has a well-balanced flavour profile that has both sweet fruity and floral flavours, as well as a hit of grassy notes at the tail end of each sip. I found that this green tea has a thickened mouthfeel to it, and it’s an easy tea to drink.

A Second Cup?

Masters Teas suggests that Huang Shan Mao Feng can been steeped up to seven times, so I did six resteeps with the same leaves. I found that the flavour got more savoury with each steep, losing that fruity and floral sweetness slowly and gaining more grassy and vegetal flavours as I continued with each steep. The tea itself also became more of a golden yellow in colour.

My Overall Impression

I loved Masters Teas’s Huang Shan Mao Feng. I really enjoyed the delicate complexity in the flavour profile of this Chinese green tea, and really enjoyed the texture in this tea as well. I loved that it started out sweet before giving way to being savoury and more grassy, which was fun to experience. I would definitely recommend resteep Huang Shan Mao Feng, because the leaves so do well with being resteeped and you can experience the different flavour notes and how it changes with each steep..

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Masters Teas’s Shi Feng Long Jing

Shi Feng Long Jing by Masters Teas
Green Tea / Straight
$29.00USD for 1.5oz

Masters Teas has provided me with Shi Feng Long Jing for the purposes of writing an honest review.

First Impressions

Shi Feng Long Jing came to me in a sealed printed, resealable pouch. There’s information regarding the origin and tasting notes, which I always appreciate. I found the steeping instructions for this Chinese green tea on the Masters Teas website on the product page for this specific tea. The leaves are flat and green – ranging from light to medium greens in colour. It’s a very familiar tea, since I’m a fan of long jing (dragonwell). There are some light grassy and floral notes from the dry leaf – I don’t sell any chestnuts despite it being referenced in the description.

Shi Feng Long Jing was harvested April of 2019, by farmer Guo Ya Ling in Zhejiang, China. This tea was harvested at 500m elevation. I always appreciate finding out more information about my teas, I think it’s great to be able to trace the tea back to its origin.

Preparation

Masters Teas recommends steeping Shi Feng Long Jing in 170°F (77°C) for 2 to 3 minutes. I opted to do an initial steep in 175°F (79°C) water that I allowed to cool for 5 minutes prior to steeping, and steeped the tea leaves for 2 minutes.

First Taste

Shi Feng Long Jing steeps to a light yellow colour. I found the aroma to be a mix of grassy and floral, while the flavour had some sweetness to balance out the grassy notes, as well as some nutty notes that remind me of cashews. It makes for pleasant cup of tea and I wouldn’t add anything to it.

A Second Cup?

Masters Teas suggests that Shi Feng Long Jing can be steeped 7 times, so I opted to do 6 resteeps of the same leaves – I added an additional 30 seconds for each subsequent steep. I found that the tea became more golden yellow and developed more of a nutty flavour in the later steeps, and lost some of that floral sweetness.

My Overall Impression

I loved Masters Teas’s Shi Feng Long Jing. I found that the flavours of this green tea to be well-balanced. I was curious about where the chestnut notes might be at the beginning, but found them after having steeped the tea. I really enjoyed each resteep, especially as the flavour profile shifted from sweet to more savoury, it made for a great tea experience and I would recommend resteeping this tea.

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