Recipe: Rose Matcha Latte

I recently tried a rose matcha latte at a cafe and it tasted like drinking perfume (and I don’t like drinking perfume, or potpourri…). But I was really intrigued by the idea of a rose matcha latte that didn’t taste like a dried bouquet so I set off on determining the right ratios of rose to everything else in order to get the flavour profile balanced, so I hope you enjoy trying out my Rose Matcha Recipe!

Bonus fun fact! Today (August 22nd) is One More Steep’s birthday! I’ve been posting reviews and recipes since 2015. To date, I have written 336 reviews, and this is my fifth recipe!

Rose Matcha Latte Recipe

1 tablespoon matcha
100mL water
1-2 tsp Rose Simple Syrup (see recipe below)
250-300mL milk (or dairy-free alternative), frothed
1-2 crushed petals from rose buds.

Sift the matcha into your bowl (or blender bottle if you’re using that).
Whisk with the heated water, and then pour into a cup.
Stir in the Rose Simple Syrup.
Froth milk – use your milk frother or (my personal favourite method) shake up a mason jar.
Pour milk into the cup of tea, spoon foam over the top.
Sprinkle crushed rose petals over top.
And enjoy!

Rose Simple Syrup Recipe

1 cup sugar*
1 cup water*
1 Tbsp dried organic rose buds

* You can make more or less simple syrup depending on how often you want to have a Rose Matcha Latte, as long as you use equal parts water and sugar. You will want a clean jar/bottle on hand to store the Rose Simple Syrup.

Combine sugar and water into a saucepan and place over medium heat.
Stir until the sugar is fully dissolved.
Allow syrup to simmer for 1-2 minutes.
Add rose buds, stir, allow to simmer for an additional 2 minutes.
Remove from heat.
Once cooled, strain/remove rose buds
Pour Rose Simple Syrup into a jar or bottle and refrigerate.
The Rose Simple Syrup will keep for at least 2 weeks in the fridge – don’t forget to label it with the date!

Recipe: Hong Kong-Style Milk Tea

Hong Kong-Style Milk Tea is something that I’ve grown up drinking. If you’ve ever popped into a Hong Kong cafe, you’ll be able to find it on the menu and everyone has their own way of making it up – but the general idea remains the same: black tea, milk, and sugar. And don’t be skimping on the fat content, because the richer the milk, the better! Hong Kong-Style Milk Tea is also frequently referred to as “pantyhose tea” or “silk stocking tea” because of the material traditionally used to filter the tea – but that’s just too much effort (and to much of a mess!) to do at home.

I grew up drinking Hong Kong-Style Milk Tea at home, where the tea used was bagged Orange Pekoe (Red Rose brand, if you’re curious). Any black tea will do, but I keep Red Rose on hand for making milk tea. When I was younger and I drank this, I’m pretty sure it was more milk than tea with a lot of sugar. I’ve since adjusted my ratios to become more tea, less milk, and a bit less sweet – but the condensed milk is still a must (or else I just use evaporated milk and white sugar…).

Hong Kong-Style Milk Tea (Hot) Recipe

1 black tea bag
300mL boiling hot water
2 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk or 1½ tablespoons evaporated milk
Sweetener of your choice*

Steep the tea – I usually do 3 minutes.
Stir in sweetened condense milk or evaporated milk.
Add sweetener of your choice (if using evaporated milk).
Enjoy!

Hong Kong-Style Iced Milk Tea Recipe

2 black tea bags
300mL boiling hot water
2 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk or 1½ tablespoons evaporated milk
Sweetener of your choice*
Ice cubes

Steep the tea – I usually do 3 minutes.
Stir in sweetened condensed milk or evaporated milk.
Add sweetener of your choice (if using evaporated milk).
Pour over ice, and give it a stir.
Enjoy!

* If not using sweetened condensed milk.

Hong Kong-Style Milk Tea is a nice treat to have, and I’m pretty sure I’ve had it every single meal at this point in my life – and after dinner! It goes great with breakfast (sweet or savoury), and it’s just a nice little treat. If you’re watching your sugar intake, I’d recommend going with the evaporated milk. You still want it to have a full-bodied richness in terms of the creaminess, so don’t use regular milk (it’s too thin).

Recipe: London Fog with Lavender Simple Syrup

One of the most elegant drinks that I’ve ever ordered at a café has been the London Fog, otherwise known as an Earl Grey tea latte. There’s a lot of variations on this popular drink and you get something a little bit different depending on where you go. Allegedly, the drink originates from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (as per its Wiki page). Today, I’m sharing my recipe for a London Fog which has everything I love in a good tea latte – made with a bit of vanilla extract and a homemade Lavender Simple Syrup.

London Fog Recipe

2 tsp Earl Grey tea or 2 tea bags – I am using DavidsTea’s Organic Earl Grey
450ml water
1 Tbsp Lavender Simple Syrup (see recipe below)
¼ tsp pure vanilla extract
125mL milk (or dairy-free alternative), frothed

Steep the Earl Grey tea to your liking – you want it to be stronger than you’d usually drink Earl Grey straight.
Stir in Lavender Simple Syrup and pure vanilla extract.
Froth milk – either with a dedicated milk frother, frothing wand, or with a mason jar (my personal favourite method).
Pour milk into your cup of tea, spoon foam over top.
And enjoy!

I’m using a 600mL double-walled latte (or soup) mug (pictured above). If you’re using a different size cup than I am, I essentially aim for approximately two-thirds of the cup for the tea and one-third for the frothed milk & foam. I find that ratio works best for my tastes when it comes to tea lattes, but you might find it needs more or less tea – experiment and figure out what works for you!

Lavender Simple Syrup Ingredients

1 cup sugar*
1 cup water*
2 Tbsp dried culinary lavender buds

* You can make more or less simple syrup depending on how often you want to have a London Fog, as long as you use equal parts water and sugar. You will want a clean jar/bottle on hand to store the Lavender Simple Syrup.

Lavender Simple Syrup Directions

Combine sugar, water and lavender buds in a saucepan and place over medium heat.
Stir until the sugar has dissolved.
Allow the syrup to simmer for 1-2 minutes, then remove from heat.
Once cooled, strain/remove lavender buds.
Pour the Lavender Simple Syrup into an jar or bottle and refrigerate.
The Lavender Simple Syrup will keep for at least 2 weeks in the fridge – don’t forget to label it with the date!

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